Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

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Jul5

Between 2004 and 2013, around 4,500 children under the age of 18 were married in Virginia. Of that 4,500, more than 200 were 15 or younger. Finally, last Friday, authorities introduced new legislation that updated rules that had, until then, made it entirely legal for girls aged 12 or 13 to be married so long as they had parental consent and were pregnant.

Jul5

Youtube prankster Coby Persin recently took to Times Square to photograph himself and his ‘wife’, who was 12 years old, in order to raise awareness of the long-standing legality of young marriage in Virginia. As a result, New Yorkers were stunned at the obscenity, and thus the state of Virginia has now passed a bill that update previous laws on marriage, which until now made it legally sound for girls aged 12 or 13 to be married, on the grounds of parental consent and of them being pregnant. The legal age has now been amended to 18.

Jul5

And shockingly, people were actually utilising the law. Figures show that between 2004 and 2013, 4,500 children under 18 were married, and of those 200 were younger than 15-years-old. 90% of those marrying underage were girls, and in most cases they married men age 21 or older.

Jul4

Between 2004 and 2013, around 4,500 children under the age of 18 got married in the state of Virginia. Of these girls, more than 200 of them were aged 15 or under. Last week, the authorities in the state introduced new legislation that updated rules that had until then made it legal for girls aged 12 or 13 to get married if they had parental consent and were pregnant. The changes - a move that campaigners said brought Virginia’s laws into the 21st Century - followed a long fight by activists who said the change was aimed at curbing forced marriage, human trafficking and statutory rape disguised as marriage.

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The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 
The General Assembly adjourned sine die on February 25th, completing work on thousands of bills and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall. 

The $107 million budget adopted by the General Assembly that avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve to be used to close future shortfalls.  

You can read an overview of the budget conference report prepared by the Senate Finance Committee here, and one prepared by the House Appropriations Committee here. Specific budget amendments adopted by the final budget conference report can be found here

The General Assembly also passed over 800 other bills than now await the Governor's action.  The Richmond Times Dispatch provided an overview of 25 of the most significant bills that passed, which you can read here.  The Governor has until March 27th to amend or veto any bills. We will return April 5th for Veto Session to vote on his actions.